Understanding Synchronous and Asynchronous JavaScript – paRt_1 : JavaScript – its DiFFereNt

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In JavaScript Synchronous and Asynchronous are very important concepts. Beginners might find them difficult to learn.
When two or more things happen at same time then it is Synchronous and when they don’t that’s Asynchronous. These definitions are easy to understand but it’s complicated than it looks from here. So let’s dig a little deeper. 
You’d probably call a normal function in JavaScript synchronous, right? And if it’s something like setTimeout() or AJAX that you’re working with, you will refer to it as being asynchronous, yes? What if I tell you that both are asynchronous in a way?
Let’s understand with an example. We’ll get help from Mr. K,

Scenario 1:-> Mr. K is trying Synchronicity 

Here’s the setup:
  1. Mr K is someone who can answer tough questions, and carry out any requested task.
  2. The only way to contact him is through a phone call.
  3. Whatever question or task you got, in order to ask Mr K’s help to carry it out; you call him.
  4. Mr K gives you the answer or completes the task right away, and lets you know it’s done.
  5. You put down the receiver feeling content and go out on a date.
What you’ve just carried out was a synchronous (back and forth) communication with Mr K. He listened as you were asking him your question, and you listened when he was answering it.

client calling server

Scenario 2:-> Mr. K isn’t happy with Synchronicity 

Since Mr K is so efficient, he starts receiving many more calls. So what happens when you call him but he’s already busy talking to someone else? You won’t be able to ask him your question – not till he is free to receive your call. All you will hear is a busy tone.

So what can Mr K do to combat this?
Instead of taking calls directly:
  1. Mr K hires a new guy, Mr J and gives him an answering machine for the callers to leave messages.
  2. Mr J’s job is to pass on a message from the answering machine to Mr K once he knows Mr K has completely finished processing all previous messages and is already free to take a new one.
  3. So now when you call him, instead of getting a busy tone, you get to leave a message for Mr K, then wait for him to call you back (no date time yet).
  4. Once Mr K is done with all the queued up messages he received before yours, he will look into your issue, and call you back to give you an answer.
Now here lies the question: were the actions so far synchronous or asynchronous?
It’s mixed. When you left your message, Mr K wasn’t listening in to it, so the forth communication was asynchronous.
But, when he replied, you were there listening, which makes the return communication synchronous.
Until now you must have understand synchronicity in communication. It’s time to bring in JavaScript in the picture.

JavaScript An Asynchronous Language

When someone labels JavaScript asynchronous, what they are referring to in general is how you can leave a message for it, and not have your call blocked with a busy tone.
The function calls are never direct in JavaScript, they’re usually done via messages
JavaScript uses a message queue where incoming messages (or events) are held. An event-loop (a message dispatcher) sequentially dispatches those messages to a call stack where the corresponding functions of the messages are stacked as frames (function arguments & variables) for execution.
The call stack holds the frame of the initial function being called, and any other frames for functions called via nested calls on top of it .

JavaScript Call Stack
JavaScript Call Stack

When a message joins the queue, it waits until the call stack is empty of all frames from the previous message, and when it is, the event-loop de-queues the previous message, and adds the corresponding frames of the current message to the call stack.
The message waits again until the call stack becomes empty of its own corresponding frames (i.e. the executions of all the stacked functions are over), then is de-queued.
Consider the following code:

function foo(){}
function
bar(){
foo();
}
function
baz(){
bar();
}
baz();

The function being run is baz() (at the last row of the code snippet), for which a message is added to the queue, and when the event-loop picks it up, the call stack starts stacking frames for baz(), bar(), and foo() at the relevant points of execution.

Push action in Call Stack

Once the execution of the functions is complete one by one, their frames are removed from the call stack, while the message is still waiting in the queue, until baz() is popped from the stack.

Pop Action in Call Stack


Remember, the function calls are never direct in JavaScript, they’re done via messages. So whenever you hear someone say that JavaScript itself is an asynchronous programming language, assume that they are talking about its built-in “answering machine”, and how you’re free to leave messages.

But what about the specific asynchronous methods?

So far I’ve not touched on APIs such as setTimeout() and AJAX, those are the ones that are specifically referred to as asynchronous. Why is that?
It’s important to understand what exactly is being synchronous or asynchronous. JavaScript, with the help of events and the event-loop, may practice asynchronous processing of messages, but that doesn’t mean everything in JavaScript is asynchronous.
Remember, I told you the message didn’t leave until the call stack was empty of its corresponding frames, just like you didn’t leave on a date until you got your answer — that’s being synchronous, you are there waiting until the task is complete, and you get the answer.
Waiting isn’t ideal in all scenarios. What if after leaving a message, instead of waiting, you can leave on the date? What if a function can retire (emptying the call stack), and its message can be de-queued even before the task of the function is complete? What if you can have code executed asynchronously?
This is where APIs such as setTimeout() and AJAX come into the picture, and what they do is… hold on, I can’t explain this without going back to Mr K, which we’ll see in the second part of this article. Stay tuned…

Mobile games growing up

The #1 on the iOS app charts this week is Fortnite, despite the fact that the game only runs if you got an invite from Epic. The pull is that except for the control scheme the game is equivalent to the PC / console version. Likewise Civilization VI exists in a mobile version equivalent to the PC game, and Final Fantasy XV on mobile is also rather close to the console version. Meanwhile PC and console games are getting closer to mobile standards regarding their business models, if you consider lootboxes.

There appears to be a huge demand to play AAA games on the go. It is one of the explanations frequently cited to explain the huge success of the Nintendo Switch console, in spite of obvious battery life problems of the concept. But the Nintendo Switch as a mobile device at least still has the same JoyCon controllers, which works a lot better than just a touch screen for some games. I wouldn’t be surprised if we would see alternative controllers that can be connected to Android and iOS mobile gaming platforms in the future.

There are still some issues to resolve on the way. Civilization VI is $60 on Steam, but there are various deals to get it much cheaper; I personally paid $12 as part of a Humble Bundle Monthly. On iOS Civilization VI costs $65, and the best deal ever was the introductory half price. With the PC version having more options in the form of DLC, as well as user-made mods from the Steam Workshop, paying more for the somewhat less mobile version doesn’t look attractive. Final Fantasy XV is better, the Steam version costs $50, while the “pocket” mobile version is $20, and you can try for free or just buy some of the chapters if you want. As much as people might like the idea of mobile AAA games, the full price of a console game is very high compared to the usual price level of mobile games.

However the main attraction of high-priced AAA games is that they tend to be “pay once, play forever”. Some companies believe that when porting games to a mobile platform, they should rather use the business models of mobile games, sometimes to a rather exploitative extent. The Sims Mobile is only playable in short bursts, until you run out of energy; then you either need to wait for hours for the energy to restore itself, or spend real money to advance with prices that make the highly expensive The Sims DLC look cheap (The Sims 4 isn’t on Steam. The Sims 3 from 2009 is, and still has $550 worth of DLCs listed.)

Part of the reason that mobile platforms are catching up to the PC is that the period of fast development of PC graphics appears to be over. My 3-year old graphics card (Geforce GTX 970) in my 4-year old computer is still playing every game at good frame rates. I used to have to change PCs every 2 years to keep up. And as Final Fantasy XV pocket edition shows, you can downgrade graphics for mobile platforms and customers won’t care all that much, as long as the gameplay is good.

In summary, I do believe that there is a trend towards more AAA games on mobile platforms. And as long as that happens at reasonable prices, I’m all for it.

JavaScript Interview Questions for Freshers


What is JavaScript, really ?

JavaScript (“JS” for short) is a full-fledged dynamic programming language that, when applied to an HTML document, can provide dynamic interactivity on websites. It was invented by Brendan Eich, co-founder of the Mozilla project, the Mozilla Foundation, and the Mozilla Corporation.

JavaScript is incredibly versatile. You can start small, with carousels, image galleries, fluctuating layouts, and responses to button clicks. With more experience, you’ll be able to create games, animated 2D and 3D graphics, comprehensive database-driven apps, and much more!

*For online documentation on JavaScript , refer the doc of creators – mdn

**For the best class-room training on JavaScript at Mumbai connect with Rocky Sir

Leaving out the very simple and basic Interview Questions, at what questions do the fresh web developers get stuck ?  Here is a list :

1. Before-the-first-Round-of-JavaScript-Interview-Questions

      download a short and sweet PDF


2. 10-common-JavaScript-interview-questions (Click on the Question for viewing the answer)


3. Step-by-step solution for step counting using recursion

step counting _sctpl

For example, if you wanted to climb 4 steps, you can take the following distinct number of steps:

1) 1, 1, 1, 1
2) 1, 1, 2
3) 1, 2, 1
4) 2, 1, 1
5) 2, 2
So there are 5 distinct ways to climb 4 steps. We want to write a function, using recursion, that will produce the answer for any number of steps
answer-to-step-counting-using-recursion

4. Determine overlapping numbers in ranges

You will be given an array with 5 numbers. The first 2 numbers represent a range, and the next two numbers represent another range. The final number in the array is X. The goal of your program is to determine if both ranges overlap by at least X numbers. For example, in the array [4, 10, 2, 6, 3] the ranges 4 to 10 and 2 to 6 overlap by at least 3 numbers (4, 5, 6), so your program should return true.
answer-to-determine-overlapping-numbers-in-ranges 



5. Find all duplicates in an array



This is a common interview question where you need to write a program to find all duplicates in an array. The elements in the array have no restrictions, but in this algorithm we’ll work specifically with integers. Finding duplicates in an array can be solved in linear time by using a hash table to store each element as we pass through the array. The general algorithm is: 


(1) Loop through the array
(2) At each element check if it exists in the hash table, which has a lookup of O(1) time
(3) If the element exists in the hash table then it is a duplicate, if it doesn’t exist, insert it into the hash table, also O(1)

for-complete-solution-to-finding-all-duplicates-in-an-array


6Two sum problem


The two sum problem is a common interview question, and it is a variation of the subset sum problem. There is a popular dynamic programming solution for the subset sum problem, but for the two sum problem we can actually write an algorithm that runs in O(n) time.

The challenge is to find all the pairs of two integers in an unsorted array that sum up to a given S. For example, if the array is [3, 5, 2, -4, 8, 11] and the sum is 7, your program should return [[11, -4], [2, 5]] because 11 + -4 = 7 and 2 + 5 = 7.

for-complete-solution-to-Two-sum-problem

7. Stock maximum profit

You will be given a list of stock prices for a given day and your goal is to return the maximum profit that could have been made by buying a stock at the given price and then selling the stock later on. For example if the input is: [45, 24, 35, 31, 40, 38, 11] then your program should return 16 because if you bought the stock at $24 and sold it at $40, a profit of $16 was made and this is the largest profit that could be made. If no profit could have been made, return -1.


for-complete-solution-to-Stock-maximum-profit


Must read: top 10 Android stories

This week we reviewed the Razer Phone and BlackBerry Motion, talked to Google about the Google Home Mini, crowned a winner in our Best of Android competition. Here’s the news of the week!


What’s the best Android smartphone on the market? Head to our Best of Android 2017 articles below to find out:

  • Best of Android 2017 – Display
  • Best of Android 2017 – Audio
  • Best of Android 2017 – Which camera looks the best? (camera shootout)
  • Best of Android 2017 – Performance
  • Best of Android 2017 – Which camera is technically the best? (technical comparison)
  • Best of Android 2017 – Battery
  • Best of Android 2017 – User experience
  • The Phone of The Year 2017 is…

Who wants to win a ZTE Axon M?

The ZTE Axon M takes gaming and productivity to the next level. Here’s how you can win one!

10 Android stories we handpicked for you

Razer Phone review Is Razer’s first smartphone a smart buy for everyone, or only for mobile gamers? Find out in our full Razer Phone review!


Google’s plan to take over the home starts with Google Home Mini We talk to Selena Salazar, product manager for Google Home Mini, about Google’s vision for the smart home, Assistant-powered refrigerators, and more.


BlackBerry Motion review: a KEYone without the keyboard Does a BlackBerry without a physical keyboard still feel like a BlackBerry or does it just turn into your average Android phone?


This is the OnePlus 5T Star Wars Edition With the release of much-anticipated Star Wars: The Last Jedi, OnePlus has announced the launch of a Star Wars-branded limited edition of the OnePlus 5T.


Why an (unofficial) anti-Amazon alliance is a very good thing Amazon has become the middle-man of everything, and are the leader of tech’s Big Four companies, over Apple, Google, and Facebook. But the fightback is on.


Which smartphones retain their resale value the best? If you’re looking to swap your flagship smartphone for a new one this year, here’s a list of the handsets with the best resale value.


Google Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL: which should you buy? Google released two different sizes of Pixel phones this year. Which should you buy— the Google Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL?


The notch is coming to a smartphone near you Get ready to see a lot of iPhone-style notches on future Android smartphones, as the design is going to be used on upcoming bezel-free displays.


How to use AR Stickers on the Google Pixel or Pixel 2 Do you have a Google Pixel or Pixel 2? If so, you can now use AR Stickers! Here’s everything you need to know.


Can the Snapdragon 845 give VR a shot in the arm? The new Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 boasts a number of improvements for virtual reality applications, but is that enough to reinvigorate the market?


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Watch more Android videos on our YouTube channel.

More hot news

  • Google announces Tango will shut down on March 1
  • Amazon announces plans to sell Chromecast and Apple TV again
  • Google Assistant finally headed to Android tablets and more smartphones
  • Synaptics’ in-display fingerprint sensors coming to Vivo phones, not Samsung
  • Zooper Widget has mysteriously disappeared from the Play Store
  • Essential Phone will gain double tap to wake, EIS, and more features in future updates
  • Disney’s purchase of Fox should make Netflix very nervous
  • Grammarly Keyboard for Android hits the Play Store
  • Google launches AR stickers on Pixel phones starring The Last Jedi and Stranger Things characters
  • T-Mobile will launch its own ‘disruptive’ pay TV service in 2018
  • Google Lens looks to get more useful with improvements and AR experiences
  • Android version distribution: Oreo up again, but has Nougat beaten Lollipop yet?
  • Google releases two new experimental photography apps for Android
  • Apple confirms it has officially acquired Shazam

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  • Star Wars: Jedi Challenges VR/AR app to add The Last Jedi content (porgs!) in 2018 [VRSource.com]
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Scientists Have Just Beaten Down the Best Climate Denial Argument

Even the best contrarian arguments against climate change have not withstood scientific scrutiny.

Climate deniers have come up with a lot of arguments about why we shouldn’t worry about global warming—about 200 of them—but most are quite poor, contradictory and easily debunked by consulting the peer-reviewed scientific literature. The cleverest climate contrarians settle on the least implausible argument—that equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS, how much a doubling of the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will increase Earth’s surface temperature) is low, meaning that the planet will warm relatively slowly in response to human carbon pollution.

But they have to explain how that can be the case, because there are a lot of factors that amplify global warming. For example, a warmer atmosphere holds more water vapor, which is itself a greenhouse gas, adding further warming. Warming also melts ice, leaving Earth’s surface less reflective, absorbing more sunlight. There are a number of these amplifying ‘feedbacks,’ but few that would act to significantly slow global warming.

Clouds are one possible exception because they both act to amplify global warming (being made of water vapor) and dampen it (being white and reflective). Which effect wins out depends on the type of cloud, and so whether clouds act to accelerate or slow global warming depends on exactly how the formation of different types of clouds changes in a hotter world. That’s hard to predict, so many contrarians have wishfully argued that clouds will essentially act as a thermostat to control global warming.

Research suggests if anything, clouds amplify global warming

A new study published in Nature by Stanford scientists Patrick Brown and Ken Caldeira found that so far, the global climate models that best simulate the Earth’s global energy imbalance tend to predict the most future global warming. These results suggest the ECS is around 3.7°C. This is higher than the previous best estimate of 3.1°C, and if correct, would shrink our carbon budget by about 15 percent.

The study found that the biggest contributor to the difference between the accurate and inaccurate models was in how well they simulated cloud changes. And while it’s just one study, several prior papers arrived at similar conclusions.

For example, a 2010 study published in the Journal of Climate found that climate models that most accurately simulate recent cloud cover changes in the east Pacific point to an amplifying effect on global warming and thus a more sensitive climate. Another 2010 study by Andrew Dessler using satellite observations showed that in the short-term, clouds likely amplify global warming, though the long-term effect may be different.

In 2012, a paper published in Science by John Fasullo and Kevin Trenberth of the National Center for Atmospheric Research found that similar to the new Nature study, climate models that most accurately simulated observed cloud changes are also the ones that are most sensitive to the increased greenhouse effect. 

Similarly, a 2014 paper published in Nature found that the least sensitive climate models incorrectly simulate water vapor being drawn up into the atmosphere to form clouds in a warmer world. In reality, as lead author Steve Sherwood explains in the video below, scientists observe water vapor being pulled away from those higher cloud-forming levels of the atmosphere.

Contrarian arguments have not withstood scientific scrutiny

Former MIT scientist Richard Lindzen (one of the most often cited, and most often wrong contrarian climate scientists) was among the first to argue that clouds act as a climate thermostat. He developed a hypothesis in 2001 that as the atmosphere warms, the area covered by cirrus clouds will contract like the iris of an eye to allow more heat to escape into space, thus slowing global warming. His ‘iris hypothesis’ was quickly disproved by subsequent research, but that hasn’t stopped climate contrarians from continuing to make the argument.

More recently, other contrarian scientists have used a combination of climate models and recent observational data to similarly argue that Earth’s climate is relatively insensitive to the increased greenhouse effect (they call these “observational estimates” of ECS). This group often likes to refer to themselves as ‘lukewarmers,’ but really they just cherry pick this one way to estimate ECS because it seemed to yield a relatively low result, while ignoring the other methods that point toward a significantly more sensitive climate.

Over the past two years, climate scientists have identified several flaws in the method that yielded lower estimates of ECS. At this year’s American Geophysical Union conference – the largest gathering of climate and Earth scientists every December – there was a session devoted to this very topic. As one of the presenting climate scientists Andrew Dessler put it:

There’s still significant uncertainty about how clouds will respond to global warming, but the evidence points to an amplifying effect, or at least not a significant dampening. The new Nature study adds to the mountain of evidence ruling out the contrarian argument for an insensitive climate. Clouds aren’t going to save us; only rapid cuts in carbon pollution can do that.

 

Related Stories

  • Wall of Shame: Top 10 Climate Deniers in the Trump Administration
  • How the Right-Wing Media Totally Distorted Positive News on Climate Change
  • How Pollution and Climate Change Hurt Children Most of All

Deal: Grab the Jaybird X3 Bluetooth earbuds for just $80

I love a good pair of Bluetooth earbuds. Since they’re wireless, they’re extremely convenient to wear while working out or laying in bed, and I don’t miss the drop in sound quality compared to wired earbuds. Sure, I have to remember to recharge them from time to time, but that’s a price I’m willing to pay for convenience. 

One of the best pairs of Bluetooth earbuds I’ve ever owned is the Jaybird X3. I was lucky enough to pick them up earlier this year on sale and I have enjoyed them ever since. I routinely cycle back and forth between them and the V-MODA Forza Metallo Wireless depending on what mood I’m in or what activity I’m doing.

See also

The X3’s are great for working out. They’re sweatproof (not waterproof), and provide a good fit. I’ve never had an issue with them falling out of my ears when I’m active. They also sound pretty decent and get loud enough to block out most everything else around me.

I recommend them to my friends who are looking for a decent pair of earbuds without breaking the bank. Now, they’re back on sale and you can pick up a pair for just $80, a $50 savings. These are great as a last minute shopping gift. Or, you could just grab a pair for yourself guilt free since they’re almost half off.

If you want to pick up a pair, you can hit the buttons below for the listings from Amazon and Best Buy. Amazon has them in four colors and Best Buy offers them in six, including exclusive Camo and Platinum paint jobs. 

get the Jaybird X3 from Best Buy
get the jaybird x3 from amazon

YouTube TV app for Apple TV and Roku to launch Q1 2018

  • The YouTube TV app will be launching on Apple TV and Roku in Q1 2018.
  • The app was originally supposed to be out by the end of the year.
  • Older Samsung and Sony smart TVs will also see the app early next year.

One of the limiting factors when choosing an over-the-top streaming service is the ability to stream the content to your TV. Most services allow some sort of casting from your phone or tablet, but that’s not a perfect solution. To do this, you’re relying on multiple pieces of hardware that could fail at any time. Additionally, some programming like the NFL don’t currently allow mobile streams of their content.

That’s why, when YouTube TV started to roll out its standalone app, I started doing a happy dance. I can now use the app on my smart TV or Xbox, and the experience is great. It saves me on Sundays and allows me to watch my beloved (but terrible) Bengals.

Editor’s Pick

Unfortunately for some users, they’re still lacking the app. Users with Apple TV and Roku devices were slated to get the app before the end of the year. Now, with only 12 days left in 2017, we’re getting word the apps are being pushed back to Q1 2018. In addition to Apple TV and Roku, the YouTube TV app will also come to older smart TVs in the first quarter. These TVs include some Samsung sets from 2013 and 2014. Older Sony TV’s that use a Linux-based OS instead of Android TV will get the app too.

Most of YouTube TV’s competitors like Sling, Hulu, DirecTV Now, and PlayStation Vue are all on numerous platforms. YouTube TV lags a bit behind the others as they’re all on Apple TV and Roku already. Where you won’t see YouTube TV is on Amazon’s Fire TV or the PlayStation 4. Google and Amazon have had very public battles (although things do appear to be getting better) and Sony refuses to let other streaming services on its gaming system while its pushing PlayStation Vue.

Despite all of that, YouTube TV is one of the popular options for cord-cutters right now. The lineup of channels is fantastic, and at just $35 a month, it’s very affordable. The service initially rolled out to only a few cities in the US when it first launched, but that number has recently pushed past 80.

Skill vs. Gear in Zelda – Breath of the Wild

I have played 120 hours of Zelda – Breath of the Wild now, and my main game character is advancing very nicely; I’m now able to kill boss mobs and tough mini bosses with relative ease or even farm them when required. More because I was interested in the technology than because I needed the boost I bought a couple of amiibo, which are Nintendo’s “toys-to-life” figurines: You can scan them with your controller and have the amiibo appear in your game, or trigger some sort of bonus effect. But because I was relatively advanced in the game already when I got them, they didn’t really change much.

So I was wondering how much of an impact it would make if one had those amiibo right from the start of a game. Now normally you can have only one save game in normal mode and one save game in master mode for Zelda. But that is per “profile”, so you can easily just create another profile and start a new game from scratch without affecting your main game. I did that, and it turned out you can’t use amiibo at the very start. You need to play until finishing the first shrine, and then you can turn the amiibos on in the options. And at that time the treasure chests you get from amiibo contain stuff like rusty or travelers weapons; which are still useful that early in the game compared to tree branches and bokoblin weapons, but certainly not game breaking. You need to finish the whole “tutorial”, that is all four shrines and get the paraglider, before the amiibo result in the “normal” treasures, e.g. the guardian amiibo drops guardian weapons and shields.

So while I was testing that, I had another idea: You can finish the tutorial in well under 1 hour, so how does a new character in an 1-hour old game compare to a character that has been played for 120 hours? If your first character was lost and weak, was that because you were still learning the game, or was that simply that he didn’t have the stats and gear you get from playing a long time?

So I took my new character without even exchanging the first 4 spirit orbs to the toughest place in the game, Hyrule castle; dressed in the starting shirt and trousers, and equipped with nothing more than can be found in the tutorial. And I am happy to report that I was doing quite well there: I basically cleaned out the place, except for the game end boss of course. I got the complete royal guard armor, which involves getting three pieces from the bottom, middle, and top of Hyrule castle. And I didn’t just sneak through the castle, but actually killed even tough mobs like moblins and guardians. Of course then I found lots of awesome weapons, so my new character now has a very impressive armory, much better than anything you can get from the amiibo.

In short, knowing the game helps a lot, and the best way to get great gear early is using that knowledge to loot the toughest places in the game. I probably won’t play that second character much, because doing the same 120 shrines again isn’t going to be all that fun, but it is interesting to know that in Zelda – Breath of the Wild skill beats gear.

Gardmore Abbey 5E rerun – Session 3

Having accompanied Sir Oakley to the temple of Gardmore Abbey and defended him against mad harpies, it turned out that the job of the heroes wasn’t finished. The 3 sacred vessels needed to purify the temple were missing, and so now they are on a quest to find them, among some other quests. A closer examination of the temple revealed a staircase down into the catacombs, with fresh footprints leading there. The group decided not to follow, but made a short rest and then headed over to the wizard’s tower.

Now I have to mention that the 4 locations in which the group can meet an evil group of rival adventurers are determined by the 4 cards drawn for that group. The first encounter was hearing of the group in Winterhaven, the second encounter was the group helping the rivals in the garden to fight giant spiders and being left holding the bag for their effort. The third encounter, in the first room of the catacombs, the group avoided by going there. And by pure chance the location where they wanted to go, the wizard’s tower, was the location for the 4th encounter. So while the group was resting the rival adventurers “moved” to the wizard’s tower.
On the way down to the wizard’s tower the group had an encounter with a Galeb Duhr and two Rust Monsters in the gate house. However the monk and the druid weren’t wearing any non-magical metal at all, the ranger stayed at a distance, and the barbarian succeeded all saving throws to turn his extra weapons into rust; so the Rust Monsters weren’t really all that scary for this particular group. Being under no time pressure the group made another short rest.
Again they discovered traces of the rival adventures, them having left climbing gear in place to descend the slope to the wizard’s tower without taking the detour through the orc camps. And finally the two groups met again, this time with the evil group in full health and ready to strike. The ensuing combat was a tough one, as the evil group had the same level 5 and outnumbered the players 5 to 4. However I had deliberately not optimized them, and so the players ultimately prevailed. With 3 of the evil group members down, the player druid offered them terms of surrender (“give us your cards and leave the abbey forever”), which they accepted. As I give out full xp even for diplomatic victories this fight got the group up to level 6, but I told them they needed to return to Winterhaven for that.
In Winterhaven there was some chaos, because their previous “diplomatic victory” had involved letting loose a beholder, who had passed by the town, burned down the church, and killed the priest, before moving on. One always needs to consider the possible consequences of not killing your enemies!
Now level 6 and back at the abbey they found the wizard’s tower’s door had been breached during their absence by a group of orcs, which then had been slaughtered by forces unknown. Mistrustful of the gargoyle statues in front of the door they first attacked them, but that was a short and easy fight. Inside the barbarian librarian found a scroll on a bloodstained sheet covering a large female form. Taking the scroll of course awoke that form, a female flesh golem, the failed attempt of the wizard to resurrect the love of his life. The fight against the golem was a bit harder, also due to some random magical effects in the room. Before going up the tower we decided to stop the session and continue next time. 

Why companies hiring Interns, build their BRAND faster?

Why should company hire Intern?

Increase productivity: Speaking of additional manpower, setting up an internship program allows you to take advantage of short-term support. The extra sets of hands help your employees be more productive, prevent them from becoming overburdened by side projects, as well as free them up to accomplish more creative tasks or those where higher-level, strategic thinking or expertise is required.

Take advantage of low-cost labor: Interns are an inexpensive resource. Their salaries are significantly lower than staff employees, and you aren’t obligated to pay unemployment or a severance package should you not hire them on full time.Moreover, while their wage requirements are modest, they’re among the most highly motivated members of the workforce.

Benefit your small business: When looking for full time work, the top talent often go for big-name businesses. But when seeking internships, learning is the leading draw. Many candidates feel they’ll get more hands-on training, real experience, and mentoring opportunities with smaller organizations.

Advantages of doing the Internship for a student

Get Real Work Experience
The biggest benefit of internships is that they offer a safe space for students and graduates to gain work experience. This is important because most employers are reluctant to hire someone who’s never worked before, they think that with no experience, you’ll probably be unreliable and not know what to do or how to work. Of course, this creates a vicious circle with no way out which is why lots of graduates end up in completely unrelated fields.

Internships can be a great solution to this problem as they allow students and graduates to experience a real workplace. Apart from the vocational skills that interns gain, they also get lots of soft skills which are crucial to not only finding a job but succeeding at one as well.

Get a Taste of Your Chosen Field
One of the greatest advantages of internships is that they allow people to experience their industry and chosen profession. This usually has one of two effects – makes people more excited and drives them to work hard and build a successful career, or they realize it’s not the right career for them.

Boosts Your CV
Internships can also benefit your CV as they are a foolproof way to demonstrate that you have work experience, as well as other workplace skills. The skills can be relevant to your chosen profession, which is admittedly crucial in a CV, but they could also be other skills, including communication and people skills that employers value.

Helps You Choose a Specialty
An internship can help you identify a particular area in your industry or profession that you’re interested in and help you acquire more knowledge regarding this area.

Following are the major companies across the world always hiring Interns

  1. Facebook
  2. Google
  3. Qualcomm
  4. Microsoft
  5. Morgan Stanley
  6. Apple
  7. HP
  8. CISCO
  9. Deloitte
  10. JP Morgan and Chase
  11. Amazon.com
For any Recruitment related advice and quality human resource , feel free to mail Ms Simran (Head-HR @ http://suvenconsultants.com )